eHealth Week 2016
 
*Please note this is a preliminary programme description which is subject to change

Empowering People


Session

1. eMental Health

Description

eMental health, which stands for online prevention, treatment and support systems, provides great opportunities for enhancement of care mental conditions.
The Netherlands is one of the leading countries in eMental health practice. We want to discuss how good examples on eMental health are used in our healthcare and can be promoted internationally.  

 

Session

2. Personal Health Records: real value for health

Description

Improving the ‘information position’ of the patient is a precondition to achieve empowerment and self-management.  Personal Health Records (PHRs) - a collection of supporting services and functionality - is a way to achieve this.
What is the added value of PHRs? How can we scale up the use of PHRs? How are PHRs implemented in EU countries, and can we find common ground?

 

Session

3. Opportunities for people with poor health literacy:
guiding principles for co-producing apps 

Description

If we aim at equal access to health services in our current digital society, digital health literacy is indispensable. All groups in society should be offered the advantages of the digital world. Health skills differ per SES group, however it is mainly in the lower SES groups where health interventions can have the biggest impact. 

Comprehensible health information is what the patient needs to take a joint decision about treatment and care. During this session we would like to have a closer look at the opportunities for people with poor health literacy and how eHealth tools could play a crucial role in this.

 

Session

4. Sexual health in digital society

Description

Sexual health is a discipline where the digitalization of communities has a major impact. Therefore, our digital age requires new ways to target and educate specifically young people and vulnerable groups. In this session the best online tools to improve sexual health through means of eHealth will be shared and discussed.

 


Session

5. Telemedicine: connecting care providers to their patient

Description

This session showcases the advantages of telemedicine: care independent of time and place, cost effective and more comfort for a patient. What are the major developments in telemedicine and how are can our systems be prepared to implement the latest techniques?

 

Session

6. Consumer eHealth : rise of apps & wearables

Description

What are the fast rising eHealth solutions for consumers and how are they interacting with the health systems? What is their added value? And how can health professionals make better use of these products?
There is a large supply of apps and wearables that are not medical devices. They focus on wellbeing and lifestyle support. This session will address the biggest risers in this field and discuss the added value of these devices for patients and healthy citizens.

 

Session

7. Shared decision making: Changing the relationship between doctor & patient

Description

Shared decision making (SDM) is a collaborative process that allows patients and their providers to make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patients’ values and preferences. During this session we will go deeper into this subject and we try to find out which approach can support this change in the relationship between patient and provider. And moreover, how can eHealth play a part in this?  

 

Session

8. Managing your own chronic condition:  implementing the right tools and getting your organisation into shape

Description

Patients with a chronic condition can highly benefit from eHealth. It provides them with tools for self-management, which enables them to take an active role in their care process. By doing this these patients can take more responsibility for their own health. In this session we will discuss which tools provide true empowerment for chronically ill patients and how care providers can integrate and implement these tools in their care process and organizations.


Trust & Standards



Session

1. It’s about adoption, stupid: an assessment of eHealth standards

Description

There are many standards in the field of health IT. However, there are only a few that are implemented on a large scale. During this session we will discuss why it is so hard to implement eHealth standards nationally. Which implementation strategies work on a local, regional, national and international level and how are these connected? What are the buy-in strategies to get people to work with and actually use the standards?

  


Session

2. mHealth: Privacy Code of conduct for app developers

Description

Trust continues to be one of the main barriers to mHealth uptake. To relieve these privacy concerns, the European Commission has been facilitating a Privacy Code of Conduct for mHealth apps. It is developed by the industry stakeholders and covers main data protection principles to be followed by app developers. Under the General Data Protection Regulation, instruments such as codes of conduct intended to contribute to the proper application of the Regulation will become even more important. In this session, we will present and discuss the final draft of the Code and the implications of the General Data Protection Regulation for the mHealth sector.

 


Session

3. Health IT & patient safety: What works? Using data for safety in health

Description

Health IT has enormous potential to make care safer when it is designed, implemented and used appropriately.  Like any new technology, there are new risks and hazards.  During this session we will discuss patient safety issues studied by a multi-stakeholder group of healthcare organizations, IT developers, safety experts, clinical users and others with the goal of making care safer together. 

 


Session

4. Towards a common approach in assessing validity and reliability of mHealth apps   

Description

The large number of lifestyle and wellbeing apps available with no clear evidence on their quality and reliability is limiting their effective uptake for the benefit of public health. Ensuring quality of data is also essential for linking apps to the electronic health records and to create trust among professionals. Several private and public initiatives exist that aim to tackle this issue. Common assessment approaches would facilitate the process both for developers and users. A European Commission working group has started to work on the guidelines for assessing data validity and reliability of mHealth apps, in particular in the context of linking data to the electronic health records. In this session, we will present and discuss the first results of this work and try to find common ground on what are the most important aspects to be taken into account in the assessment.

 


Session

5. eID: high-trust level authentication services for the end user: what works?

Description

Every EU member state is working on a national eID infrastructure, compliant with the eIDAS standards and regulations. In theory, this will create an eID infrastructure that should work in cross-border transactions. But what are the working examples in the wild that actually do work and what makes them work? This session focuses on high-level trust authentication services in the health(care) sector, and looks at the user perspective.

 


Session

6. eHealth interoperability: Creating European infrastructure for safe exchange of data  

Description

Recently a number of EU initiatives have been launched that aim to support the deployment of interoperable  eHealth solutions across Europe. A big step towards deployment is made with a project which will be funded from the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) to create a European infrastructure for safe exchange of patient summaries and ePrescriptions across borders. This European infrastructure will enable the continuity of healthcare for patients but it also opens up possibilities for European Reference Networks in the area of rare diseases. What does CEF mean for the Member States and what needs to be done to be able to exchange health data cross-border? Also does CEF speed up the developments on eHealth in Member States? This session will focus on practical examples from EU Member States on how the EU tools and common frameworks are applied nationally in the context of CEF.

 


Session

7. EU-US: Facilitating interoperability across the Atlantic

Description

Interoperability challenges in eHealth are the same on both sides of the Atlantic. Progress has already been made since 2012 under the EU-US Roadmap in finding common approaches. What steps have been taken and what still needs to be done in order to make the International Patient Summary or a global identification of medicinal products a reality? In this interactive session, we will present and discuss recent international developments as well as areas for future cooperation with practical examples from both sides of the Atlantic.


Social innovation & transition


Session

1. Serious gaming

Description

Serious gaming is an increasingly important domain of eHealth with great potential when it comes to supporting daily life and stimulating change of behavior e.g. for physical disabled or for mental support of youth. And also in the field of prevention and lifestyle. During this session we hope to find out what are good examples of scaled-up serious games and what was their success strategy in scaling up. Awareness of possibilities for use in different segments of (health)care.

 

Session

2. Adapting health professionals education to fit innovation

Description

ICT is changing healthcare delivery significantly. Curricula are changing as well. These sessions will show best-practices from across the EU about how programs are changing. During the session best practices in health professional education will be exchanged and the session aims to help create collaborating networks in Europe. Conclusions will be drawn on the requisite skills of healthcare professionals and potential new roles (such as an Implementation Officer in healthcare facilities).

 

Session

3. What are companies, governments and third parties investing in to scale up eHealth? 

Description

Scaling up eHealth (infrastructures) requires access to finance for investments. Which parties are willing to invest in eHealth solutions? Based on several reports an overview will be given on the major areas of investments in scaling up eHealth. Do companies and governments have the same focus? Is more coordination needed? What type of new public/private investment strategies are successful? During this session you will be given an overview of investments in eHealth and alignment of investment strategies and we will identify possible gaps or overlap in investment instruments. Furthermore, there will be time to have a closer look at the difference between government and company investment in implementing and scaling up eHealth.

 

Session

4. Mobilizing the community

Description

Even though the healthcare market is not a traditional market, it is to some extent consumer-driven. If the demand is great enough, the supply will follow. End-users in healthcare are often patients who are not used to a role of equal shared decision maker. In this session you will get an insight in how to stimulate demand from citizens as an important pull to scale up the use of new eHealth solutions.

 

Session

5. Working differently with new roles > new forms of cooperation 

Description

Scaling up of eHealth implies changes to the work processes, roles and responsibilities of people.  People must adopt eHealth as integrated part of their work taking into account it leads to changes in their work process. To be innovative, is to let go of old habits. These are stories of people who implement innovation and let go of old habits. For example, what is the impact of eHealth solutions on the practice of dentistry? This session will provide you with insights on impact on roles, processes, organizations, networks based on real-life scaled up initiatives and changing attitudes and ways of thinking. Further you will be given practical tools to implement these insights in one’s own initiatives at regional or national level.

 

Session

6. Supporting informal carers

Description

Informal carers, be it family, friends, neighbours or others, play a crucial role in supporting people at home maintaining their independence and quality of life. At the same time informal carers are limited in their support due to time constraints, travelling distance or others. eHealth solutions can play a vital role supporting informal carers and indirectly clients/patients and formal carers/professionals. During this session you will be shown successful eHealth solutions supporting informal carers. We will focus on their role in care processes now and in the near future and we hope to give you insights in effectiveness of eHealth interventions for informal carers.

 

Session

7. End user involvement

Description

To show how end users can be and must be involved in different stages of development and implementation of innovative solutions and products. From concept to development, testing, making the product, pricing and marketing products, including managing needs assessment, incorporate design and practical usability. Examples will be given on how it has been put into practice. This session will provide you with concrete easy to use tools and guidelines to include end users at all levels of innovation.

 

Session

8. Promoting copy cat behavior / Re-invented here

Description

One of the greatest challenges in up scaling good initiatives is the fragmented organization and culture of healthcare resulting in reinventing wheels and the infamous ‘not invented here’ virus. At the same time it is not easy to translate a good practice elsewhere easily to one’s own situation. What can be done to stimulate copy cat behavior and how to become a good copy cat? Questions like this will be addressed in this session and practical tips and tricks will be shared on how to become a good copy cat for healthcare organizations and professionals.

 

Session

9. Good implementation practices – Readiness for scaling up

Description

To ensure scaling up of successful initiatives it is elementary to make the right choices at the start and during projects. This narrows the gap between a successful  eHealth project and successful implementation and scaling up. What can be learnt as good implementation practices from successful initiatives and what measures did they take at the start and during the project? During this session practical guidelines for starting up and managing implementation projects as first phase towards scaling up will be shared and discussed.

 

Session

10. Scaling up robotics and/or domotics for Active & Assisted Living   

Description

In the (near) future, robotics and domotics will add value to the quality of life of elderly and will assist them in healthy and assisted living at home. This is not only a matter of smart technology, but also with acceptance, including ethical aspects. Possibilities of new technologies seem endless. But do we pay enough attention to the human aspect? What are the effects of technology replacing human contact? How can we deal with these issues? In this session we will identify areas where robotics and domotics have the most added value and practical guidelines for practical initiatives will be shared. Listing carefully to the target groups (no high level discussions and/or focus on policy making).




Session

11. EU-US: Collaboration on Workforce IT skills   

Description

One of the major challenges faced by healthcare systems on both sides of the Atlantic is ensuring that the workforces have a sufficient level of IT skills for the uptake and implementation of eHealth/Health IT. The EU and US have been collaborating on IT Healthcare workforce development since 2013 under the EU-US MoU Roadmap. This interactive session will involve presentations on the lessons learnt from transatlantic cooperation in this area, including international use of jointly developed EU-US tools such as the Health IT Competencies platform (HITCOMP) and provides an opportunity to give input for the future actions in the field.

 

Session

12. EU-US: Healthcare Innovation Ecosystems 

Description

In addition to collaboration on interoperability and workforce IT skills, it has been agreed to expand the Transatlantic collaboration on eHealth/Health IT to Innovation Ecosystems. This interactive session will provide an opportunity for attendees to learn about the early stages of this new work-stream of the EU-US MoU Roadmap, which has been the subject of a recent public stakeholder consultation and launch by webinar.